Russia

Russia is big. To big for two people. Even so we tried to catch a bit of the Russian soul with this articles. Take a look.

Uru and Artur

1. The Trans-Siberian railway and how to start your own adventure

“I like trains. I like their rhythm, and I like the freedom of being suspended between two places, all anxieties of purpose take care of: for this moment I know where I am going” – Anna Funder, Stasiland

Did our imagination ever changed? The thought about trains evokes romantic feelings. It is an adventure full of freedom, followed by the sound of the wheels on the track and perhaps some country music in the background.

My favourite singer during this trip was Tracy Chapman

The train I will present you is a bit different than the one from your imagination. The train and his road are legendary. Of course I speak about the Tran-Siberian railway. 9288 kilometres from Moscow to Vladivostok

11006
The main route. Picture HERE

The road heads from west to the very east of the biggest country in the world. Following this railway is like going back in time by 100 years (Check out this interesting German article HERE).

image
The end or the beginning of the journey. The “9288 kilometer” pole in Vladivostok

In THIS VIDEO you can get a summarized overview of what is waiting for you  Of course the video deals with all the cliches combined. In my opinion you will meet only less than the half of the seen pictures. If you are interested in our personal experiences along this legendary railroad, wait till the next article 😉

The following text will give you a detailed overview how to start your own Tran-Siberian adventure. Advice ahead: Take it easy and focus.

In my opinion there are all in all two mighty factors that will influence your journey: Money and luck.

You can enjoy the Transsiberian in the most luxurious and comfortable way, e.g. with the “Golden Eagle” train.

golden-eagle-train_3
Picture HERE

If money is nothing to worry about, than just book one of the luxurious and stylish “all-inclusive” journeys with a travel company. This kind of trip will give you a fantastic opportunity to visit the most famous places in Russia, dinning on extravagant food and enjoying a “hotel on wheels”. I heard that such a journey offers the greatest the 19th century experience but maybe is lacking of the social and cultural factor.

Well, but if your bank-account contains a lower number than your postal code then, you might reduce the factor “money” and get befriended with “luck”. Be careful: Luck is fragile!

Even so, you can cheat a bit on luck. Your cheat is “planning”. Actually to have a good plan can influence both main factors. You might ask me now: Why is planning not a main factor? It is not that easy to explain. All in all, you will deal with Russia and “Russia is the country of the infinite impossibilities”. Take a look on this great Video.

Take it easy, keep a cool head and start your preparation.

1.The first thoughts

You can begin your planning with the following questions:

  1. Will I travel alone?[1]
  2. How good is my Russian language or do I know somebody in Russia?[2]
  3. What would I like to see along the road?[3]
  4. Will my trip lead me out of Russia more than once?[4]
  5. Which train and class would I like to book?
  6. How long would I like to explore a waypoint?
  7. Where do I sleep there?[5]
  8. What shall I take in my backpack?

When you go to Russia for the first time, please inform yourself about the visa requirements. Start at least 2 months before your journey because this step takes time and energy. Read more HERE. However Russia is not the easiest country to get a visa.

Also take in note about crossing the Russian border more than once, especially if you go on the famous Mongolia/China track, in this case you will need the more expensive “multi entry visa”.

I would recommend you to buy the tickets one month ahead. The prices will be cheaper and you can choose between more seats. A great site for purchasing a train ticket is TUTU.RU. On TUTU.RU there will be no problems with payment by credit card or other options. Trust me on this point![6]

The site is also great because it provides you with all the necessary information about the trains and prices (of course in English).

If you rely on a travel agency, this first steps are not important for you. But the further information is a must for all travellers.

2. More than one track

There are two main routes along the Transsib.: Moscow-Vladivostok, Moscow-Beijing. If you going nonstop from the start to the end, then you will be probably spending a week in the train. This is the cheapest, easiest and quickest way to experience the Tran-Siberian railroad.[7] But where is the adventure if not in exploring the famous Siberian and Asian cities? Take your time and inform yourself about the different places.

On our journey we made a stop in Yekaterinburg, Novosibirsk, Ulan-Ude and Vladivostok. If you have missed our impression video about the route, then click HERE.

3. The Trains and Classes

If you travel from A to B, usually you can choose between different trains.

Russians told me that it is wiser to take a train with a lower number in its name. These newer trains have a higher comfort zone and are cleaner. This information could be true, but needs more evidences. Please read the additional information at TUTU.RU before buying a ticket. Some trains are company, express or business trains which have only two seat classes to offer.

And from this point it gets a bit complicated. Depending on what train you choose there will be different classes with names and letters like these: 2Э or 3 П, 3 У. Information for the different names you will find HERE.

So what’s the big deal between the classes except the money?

Usually there are four classes in a train. I will especially focus on the 2th and 3th class, which I personally experienced.

First class: Truly no idea. For more details check out HERE.

Second class: The compartment class. It is small and cozy. We travelled once in the second class during our longest route (Ulan Ude – Vladivostok). The compartment is a little cabin with four “seats”.[8]

DSC02731
Second class

If you choose this class, that you have to deal with “luck”. Your comfort and fun during the journey will be influenced by your compartment mates. Mostly they will be Russians travelling from X to Y. During the long way you will be forced to communicate. Your mates, in the most case elders, will try to speak with you. Their motivations could be different: Interest, boredom or just habit. Even if you don’t speak Russian, you can get in touch with the people. Try to speak about interesting stuff like your homeland, your journey, food or alcohol. It makes a base for great communication everywhere.

DSC02698
Enjoyng time together

From my point of view the worst things that can happen in the second class is:

  1. Silence or non-conversation time which creates a cold atmosphere (besides the marvellous air conditioner which usually drives on “Polar” modus).
  2. You will be overloaded with much food or alcohol. Depends how generous your mates are.
  3. Lively discussions about the II World War, politicians, football or Ukraine. It depends of course of your language skills.

Other negative situations you can be confronted with are: Loud snoring[9] and lovely feet smell.

Besides all the negative stuff the second class can offer you the best experience to get to know Russians, their culture or/and traditional food. In no other class you will be so close to Russian people.

Third class: The open coupe. When the luxurious train is a hotel on wheels, than this is a hostel. In the third class 52 people live in a tiny space with a bad air conditioning. This class is the most popular among Russians. It is cheap, it is crowded and it is a lot of fun.

When you purchase a ticket for this class you have to choose a seat/lounger. Try to get a place at a downer lounger. Avoid the places alongside the wagon floor. This lounger can be pretty annoying to sleep because it is the corridor and people will pass by nonstop,

TransSib3-0652
Third class and the corridor. Picture HERE

Why a seat below and not a lovely place above where I am more secured from the views of the others? Well, there are no ladders! You will have to climb on your own strength between people and a tiny space. Also the higher seats are not made for sitting straight, except you are smaller than 140cm.

The third class is a huge open space, where noises, smell and bright light is shared by all passengers. There is no privacy. On the other side the open space gives you a great chance to meet a lot of different people or witness some Russian traditions (singing, drinking, card games). Stay calm and friendly. Usually no other problems appear here.[10] Real drunk people will be watched by other passengers and be rebuked by the supervisor.

Did I forget to mention the law and order of the Trans-Siberian train? The supervisor, mostly a female person, identifiable by the uniform, is the chief of the wagon. He or she checks your ticket, gives you the fresh bed sheets, keeps  an eye on the passengers and provides you with important information (of course only in Russian!). If you’ve got a problem, contact the supervisor. Don’t give up! They are usually unfriendly but helpful.

_49315216_moscownicetrain
The supervisor with uniform. Picture HERE

Forth class: Similar to the third class, instead of lounger there will be only seats.

4. Surviving tips

Here some useful tools you can carry with you for the second and third class: Earplugs, headphones, sleeping mask, shoe spray, nose protector, cleaning tissues, plastic bags (!)[11], toilet paper (!) and a little soap.

The following notes are summarized from Uru and me and are influenced by our experiences:

  1. Take care of the time! All trains, stops and stations run on Moscow time. Even if you are at the Vladivostok train station the time is -7 hours.[12]
  2. Take toilet paper and wet tissues, as well as a disinfection spray[13]
  3. Do not buy seats at the end of the wagon. The toilet is nearby and the people constantly is passing by and you will be troubled with obvious smell
  4. The boiler in the front of the wagon is your friend. He provides you with hot water for tea or cupnoodles . But also forces you to carry boiling water in cups you filled too much through a moving train back to your seat by the narrow and busy corridor. You will need all your luck if you were stupid enough to fill two cups. Learn how to handle this Russian technology!
DSC02696
Friend or foe? The water heater.
  1. Buy some food before the journey. Sometimes the train stops for over 30 minutes. At the station grannies try to sell homemade food, but is not a certain thing, so be prepared.

+ Bonus + Take a bottle of Vodka and some sweets to share with your neighbours. It improves the contact.

  1. Plugs are rare in the wagon. Mostly in the front- and backside. Sometimes they work sometimes not. The power is only 210V![14]

+ Bonus + Take distributor outlets and share them with people

  1. Do not try to keep up with Russians on the vodka intake. This game you will loose. By the time they get tipsy you definitely had much too much.

Now you should be pretty good prepared for your first Trans-Siberian trip.

If you have some more questions or you looking forward to share your experiences, please leave a comment.

Thanks for reading.

Uru and Artur

 

[1] More company means more bureaucratic work. It is not easy to book tickets for a big group.

[2] Russian is the main language in Russia! Even a lot of people in the office area cannot speak English and a lot of important information will mostly be written in Cyrillic letters. So either you learn some useful Russian words, carry a good dictionary with you or rely on a Russian friend.

[3] Check out the route and the cities (wikitravel.org is a good friend). The more stops you make the more expensive the journey gets.

[4] If you are heading to Mongolia and/or China and back to Russia, you will need a multi entry visa for Russia.

[5] I highly recommend Couchsurfing. For us it was really easy to find hosts on the waypoints, and we made great experiences. Check out my other article about Couchsurfing.

[6] I lost a whole month because I had problems to buy the tickets from another Russian site. This official site was also less touristic friendly.

[7] From Moscow to Vladivostok the train needs about 6,5 days. A one-way ticket costs less than 300€ (third class).

[8] If you need even more private space, it is possible to book a cabin only for two (depends on the train).

[9] We experienced many times the bonus game: Double snoring dubstep, where the snoring star gets a choir of lesser volume snorers echoing him (best snore stars being men).

[10] Except the ones I already described.

[11] As a personal bin for food or used stuff.

[12][12] This can be VERY confusing. Every train station is like a different dimension with its own physical laws. Take special care when you purchase a ticket and have a look on the Siberian timetable.

[13] Some train-toilets have no paper at all and are in a really bad condition.

[14] I used it for my laptop and mobile phone. No problems appeared.

 

______________________________________________

 

2. Die transsibirische Eisenbahn (1) – Immer mit der Ruhe

Ich kenne die russischen Züge. Ich kenne die vollen Waggons, die sich wiederholende sanfte Musik der rauschenden Schienen und den Geschmack des heißen Tees auf der Fahrt. Zu den russischen Zügen gehören auch die dreckigen Toiletten, das unfreundliche Personal und die schlaflosen Nächte.
In Moskau eilten wir zu einem Zug, der ganz anders war, als alles, was ich bisher kannte. Dieser Zug war berühmt, er würde uns auf einer legendären Strecke bis an das östlichste Ende der uns vertrauten Welt bringen. Es war die Reise mit der transsibirischen Eisenbahn.

image
Hoffnungsvoller Blick in die Zukunft. Was erwartet uns?

In Moskau an einem grauen und leicht kühlen Augustabend standen wir vor ihm. Von außen waren die Waggons vergleichbar mit anderen russischen Zügen, nur ihre Farbe weichte von dem gewohnten ab. Auf einem grauen Hintergrund leuchtete die rote Schrift “Pro”.

image

Die Massen der Passagiere drängten sich in einer Schlange in die Waggons und schoben ihr schweres Gepäck vor sich. Ob die Reise angetreten werden kann oder nicht, überprüfte ein Schaffner vor jedem Waggon. Flink suchte er nach unseren Namen in seinem elektronischen Gerät. „Online-Tickets?“ „Ja.“ „Gut“. Erste Hürde überwunden.

Wir quetschen uns mit unseren großen Rucksäcken durch den Korridor des Waggons und fanden unsere beiden Liegen. Weil ich bei der Buchung Pech gehabt habe, waren nur noch zwei Plätze entlang des Korridors für uns verfügbar. Uru bekam die Liege unten, ich die Liege oben. Das passte mir gar nicht. Ich bin zu groß, um oben auf der Liege gerade zu sitzen oder mich einfach nur auszustrecken. Auch ist es ein kleiner Akrobatikakt notwendig, um sich ohne Leiter nach oben zu schwingen.

TransSib3-0652
Die dritte Klasse als “Hostel auf Rädern”

Mit unserem seltsamen Gepäck, der Ukulele und natürlich unseren bunten Jacken, erregten wir Aufmerksamkeit bei den Leuten. Blicke folgten uns. Doch sie deuteten auf eine freundliche Neugierde hin. Noch war alles still.

Pfeifen von draußen, ein Schrei und endlich ruckelte der Zug. Wir fuhren los. Ab diesem Punkt begann für uns das Abenteuer, das Eintauchen in eine fremde Welt. Nach dem Ural würde eine endlose Landmasse auf uns warten: Sibirien. Es kribbelt ein wenig in mir, denn östlicher als Moskau bin ich noch nie gewesen. Uru ebenfalls nicht. Was würde uns auf der Fahrt und unseren Stationen in Jekaterinburg, Novosibirsk, Ulan Ude und Wladiwostok erwarten?
Für unsere erste Strecke waren wir bestens gerüstet und in den 24 Stunden bis nach Jekaterinburg würden wir nicht verhungern. Das Essen kauften wir vor Reisebeginn im Supermarkt. Dies war deutlich billiger, als die angebotenen Speisen im Zug. Das Trinken würde uns ebenfalls nicht ausgehen, denn in jedem Wagon versorgte ein großer Wasserboiler die Passagiere mit heißem Wasser.

image
Freund oder Feind? Der übergroße “Samowar”

Praktisch für Tee und Suppen. Hier sorgte ich ebenfalls mit Reisegeschirr vor. Ein guter Russe hat immer seine gläserne Teetasse mit verzierter Glashalterung dabei.

tee (1)
Original HIER

In den ersten Stunden knabberten wir an unseren mitgebrachten Chips und beobachteten die Landschaft. Moskau verschwandt erst nach einiger Zeit und mit der Stadt auch das Licht. Grau verwandelte sich zu schwarz.  Mit der Dunkelheit dämmten sich die Lichter im Waggon und die Gespräche der Leute wurden leiser. Unser Waggon der dritte Klasse bot für 52 Menschen Platz. Es reisten Arbeiter, Familien und auch Einzelpersonen zu unbekannten Zielen. In manchen Gesichtern konnte ich Müdigkeit, Vorfreude auf ein Wiedersehen oder einfach nur Langeweile ablesen. Für die meisten hier war das kein Abenteuer, eher Routine oder Pflicht.

image
Man vertreibt sich die Zeit mit Kaffee und Karten

Die Nacht trat hier bereits gegen zehn Uhr ein. Keine Musik, kein lautes Lachen und keine alten Omis, die zu laut mit ihrem Handy telefonieren, unterbrach das ewige klappern der Schienen. *Tschtschk, Tschtschk* gaben die Räder von sich, fast schon hypnotisch. So ereilte der Schlaf schnell und der stickige Wagon dämpfte die Sinne. Gleich den Grillen in der Nacht, erhob sich ein Chor von individuellen Geräuschen: Das Schnarchen der Leute war hier die Musik der Nacht. Mal lauter, mal leiser, synchron oder dissonant. Eine unsichtbare Hand dirigierte dieses Orchester. Ich packte meine Kopfhörer aus und schaltete die Musik an.

Weil wir im Korridor schliefen, gingen die Leute ununterbrochen an uns vorbei. Einige  redeten leise miteinander, andere streiften ab und zu an meinen heraushängenden Füßen vorbei und andere brachten ihr Raucherwolke mit in den Wagon. Doch keine betrunkenen und überlauten Männer nahmen uns den Schlaf, ja selbst die Kinder schliefen. Dies war schon fast ein zu ruhiger Anfang für ein Abenteuer.

image
Wo Träume noch Zeit haben. Es eilt doch nicht

Schlafen kann man in der dritten Klasse jedoch nie ausreichend. Das erste Tageslicht weckt  die Frühaufsteher und diese wecken den Rest. Ein ungeschriebenes Gesetz. Zeit zum frühstücken. Kekse, Tee und Obst. Unsere Nachbarn gegenüber wurden durch unsere Unterhaltungen neugierig. Wir waren Ausländer die zu bunt angezogen waren und Englisch sprachen. Zwei älteren Damen und ein Herr, fragten mich vorsichtig im gebrochenem English. „Where do you from?“ Ich antwortete ihnen auf Russisch „Mi is germanii, puteschestwaim po miru…“ Sie waren überrascht zu hören, dass wir zwei „Deutsche“ eine solche Strecke fahren. Niemand von ihnen war jemals so weit gereist. Im Verlauf des Gesprächs wurden andere Nachbarn hellhörig und setzten sich zu uns. Die Atmosphäre war ausgelassen und offen. Nur Uru blieb etwas isoliert. Ich versuchte ihr das Gespräch zu übersetzen. Doch auch das förderte nicht ihre Integration. Russland spricht russisch. Mit Englisch hat sich schon so manch Reisender verhangen und verheddert. Vorsicht!

Die letzten Stunden vor dem Ziel verstrichen schnell. Grüne Landschaften, geprägt von Nadelbäumen und Birken wichen den ersten kleinen Häusern, dann den großen Gebäuden. Die Abendsonne verwandelte die kommende Stadt in eine goldene Lüge und tröstete über die vorhandene Kälte hinweg.

Jekaterinburg empfing uns mit nur 15 Grad. Rund um den Bahnhof war das Stadtbild eher trist. Selbst die „Hasenohrenbusse“ (elektrisch betriebene Busse mit zwei Antennen) sahen aus, als seien sie seit über 40 Jahren im Dienst.

image
Der Zweiohrbus…äh Keinohrbus…ah egal

Später würde uns die Stadt ein ganz anderes Bild bieten, doch dies sei eine andere Geschichte.

image
Jekaterinburg von seiner weniger schönen Seite

 

Artur

 

______________________________________________

 

3. Die transsibirische Eisenbahn (2) – Wo bleibt der Wodka?

Wenn ich im Nachhinein über das Abenteuer in der transsibirischen Eisenbahn nachdenke, erscheint mir mein Zeitgefühl paradox. Eigentlich hätte sich die Reise in einem langsamen, ja langweiligen Tempo, vollziehen müssen. Auf den fast 10.000 Kilometer von West bis nach Ost fuhren wir in einer Geschwindigkeit von 60-80 km/h und machten unterwegs mehrere Zwischenhalte. Rechnet mal nach, wie lange die Bahn eigentlich fährt.

Doch die Reise war keineswegs langsam. Die zwei Wochen unterwegs verstrichen viel zu schnell. Was bleibt sind bunte Erinnerungen und einige scharfe Bilder von Menschen und Orten, lächelnd und sanft. Warum sind die Gedanken daran immer so inspirierend und traurig? Jede Reise hat ihr Ende.

Unser Aufenthalt in Jekaterinburg war kurz. Wir verweilten nicht einmal 24 Stunden in der Stadt. Die meiste Zeit widmeten wir unseren Couchsurfing Gastgeberin, Eva. Danke dir für die schöne Zeit!

image
Blick in eine hoffnungsvolle Zukunft 2

Am Abend des nächsten Tages reisten wir bereits ab. Ein neuer Zug mit gleicher Reisesituation. Wir schliefen wieder in einem Waggon der dritten Klasse.  Diesmal habe ich zwei Liegen in einem Abteil reserviert. Uru bekam die oberen Liege, ich die untere. Hurra! Auf dieser Strecke würde ich leichter schlafen, ohne mit der Angst zu leben, bei einer Notbremsung aus 2 Metern Höhe zu fliegen.

Der Zug fuhr pünktlich los, als könnte er die frische des Abends nicht mehr aushalten. Ich schaute noch einmal verwirrt auf die Uhr, die Zeit stimmte nicht. Das System war mir zu merkwürdig. Mit den Abfahrtszeiten kann man sich hier schnell vertun, denn alle Züge auf der transsibirischen Strecke fahren nach Moskauer Zeit. Sibirien ist das größte Land der Erde mit acht (?) Zeitzonen. Und dennoch richten sich alle Züge und Abfahrtzeiten entlang der transsibirischen Strecke nach der Moskauer Zeit (wollt ihr sicher mit der transsibirischen Bahn reisen, dann lest HIER meine Tipps für die Fahrt). Ich stellte meine Uhr wieder um und rechnete die Dauer der Fahrt in meinem Kopf aus. Etwa 24 Stunden würden wir von Jekaterinburg bis nach Novosibirsk brauchen.

image
Die Wolken malten uns ein tolles Bild bei der Weiterreise

Die ersten zehn Minuten der Reise begannen mit dem üblichen Kennlernritual mit der wichtigsten Person im Zug (nein nicht der Führer), dem Schaffner. Dieser gibt die frischen Bettbezüge aus und an seiner/ihrer ersten Handlung kann schon erfahren, ob er/sie eine angenehme Person ist. Ist der Schaffner mürrisch oder hektisch, sollte man ihm lieber aus dem Weg gehen. Ein ausgelassener oder ruhiger Schaffner dagegen, ist immer für einen Plausch zu haben. Vorausgesetzt man beherrscht die Russische Sprache.

_49315216_moscownicetrain
Der Schaffner in Uniform. Original HIER

Nach der Verteilung der Bettutensilien wurden die Decken bezogen. Hier spielte sich ein anderes Ritual ab: Alle Mitreisenden meckerten wie üblich über die schlechte Klimaanlage im Waggon. Andere wunderten sich, wo eigentlich ihre Decken und Kissen abgeblieben sind. Nach erfolgreicher Suche und weiteren Tauschaktionen, war das Eis unter den Passagieren meist gebrochen. Unsere “Zimmergenossen” waren eine jüngere Frau, die auf der Fahrt kein Wort sagte, und eine ältere Dame. Nach den ersten Smalltalk mit der Dame, wurden gleich Tee und Kekse angeboten. Essen und Trinken verbindet Menschen auf der ganzen Welt, also nicht abschlagen, auch wenn es sich bewegt. Gut in Russland gab es eigentlich eins, was mir persönlich Sorgen gemacht hat, Wodka. Doch das russische Nationalgetränkt fehlte auf den Tischen im Waggon. Vielleicht weil es hier kaum Männergruppen oder alleinreisende Männer gab oder weil wir einfach den falschen Waggon erwischt haben.

Irgendwo floss der Raketentreibstoff dennoch, denn in der Nacht, als unser Wagen schon dunkel und friedlich war, torkelte ein sehr glücklicher Mann durch den Korridor. Scheinbar hatte er sich verirrt, denn er ging auf und ab. Nach seiner erfolglosen Suche legte sich einfach auf eine freie Liege vor uns. Das ging in Ordnung. Sein Schnarchen war nicht ungewöhnlich oder auffällig, aber seine Füße ließen uns keine Ruhe. Ihre Geruchswolke schlich langsam und penetrierend in meine Nasen und weckte mich aus dem Halbschlaf. Ich war nicht der Einzige. Andere Nachbarn wurden wach. Ich hörte, wie sie sich leise zusammentaten und über das Problem diskutierten. Manchmal hörte ich das Wort “Wodka”. Wodka hilft in Russland scheinbar gegen alle Sorgen. Doch dann schlich eine mutige Nachbarin, bewaffnet mit einem Deo-Spray zur Quelle des Übels. Heimlich besprühte sie die Socken. Wenig später tat es ihr eine andere Frau gleich. Doch das alles trug nicht zur allgemeinen Verbesserung bei. Danach geisterte in der Luft eine interessante Mischung aus Käse, Schweiß, Chemikalien und Vanille. Ich schütze mich mit meiner Decke vor dieser Katastrophe. Der Schlaf war kurz.

image
Wie sehr ich kurze Nächte liebe…

Am nächsten Morgen war der Mann so verschwunden, wie er gekommen war und wir erfreuten uns am Geruch vom frischen Tee und mitgebrachten türkischen Bananen. Wir hatten genügend Zeit, um unsere Nachbarn kennenzulernen. Diesmal erregte Uru die Aufmerksamkeit der Leute. In Russland konnte sie als Nordspanische Frau die Blicke der Männer auf sich ziehen, doch heute begeisterte sie alle Anwesenden mit Musik. Sie holte unsere Ukulele heraus und begann, “Don’t worry be happy” zu spielen. Nachdem meine schiefe Stimme hinzugab, mussten die Leute einfach nur zu uns herüberschauen. Die meisten wirkten glücklich und neugierig, was für eine Erleichterung. Unser erstes freies Konzert war doch ein Erfolg. Eine junge Künstlerin neben uns war so begeistert von der Ukulele, dass sie sich später ebenfalls traute zu spielen.

image
Wie die Zeit vergeht

Noch mehr Leute, angezogen von der Musik und von den zwei attraktiven Frauen, setzten sich in unser Abteil. Mit der fröhlichen Musik aus Adventure Time “The Butterflies and Bees” kamen wir alle ins Gespräch über Kulturen und das Reisen selbst. Mit dieser positiven Energie verging die Fahrt so schnell, sodass die Landschaft auf der Fahrt uns kaum in Erinnerung blieb. Irgendwas mit Grün und Bäumen. Zum fotografieren war der Zug leider zu schnell.

image
Oft liegen auf der Strecke kleinere Dörfer

Unser nächstes Ziel rückte immer näher. Novosibirsk, die junge Stadt auf der transsibirischen Strecke. Groß, einladend und erfolgreich sollte sie sein. Dieser Stadt möchte ich gerne einen eigenen Artikel widmen, insbesondere als Dank für unsere fantastische Couchsurfing Gastmutter.

image
Novosibirsk läd ein

Die zwei Tage vergingen wie immer zu schnell. In der herannahenden Nacht und den angehenden Lichtern verließen wir die Stadt und stiegen in unseren vorletzten Zug ein. Vor der Abreise wurden wir noch mit einem Festessen versorgt. So stürzten wir gleich auf die Liegen und verschoben den sozialen Aspekt auf den nächsten Tag. Die Abfahrt bemerkten wir kaum, nur Lichter und Farben rauschten an uns vorbei, zum ruhigen Klang der Schienen.

Artur

 

Wenn ich im Nachhinein über das Abenteuer in der transsibirischen Eisenbahn nachdenke, erscheint mir mein Zeitgefühl paradox. Eigentlich hätte sich die Reise in einem langsamen, ja langweiligen Tempo, vollziehen müssen. Auf den fast 10.000 Kilometer von West bis nach Ost fuhren wir in einer Geschwindigkeit von 60-80 km/h und machten unterwegs mehrere Zwischenhalte. Rechnet mal nach, wie lange die Bahn eigentlich fährt.

Doch die Reise war keineswegs langsam. Die zwei Wochen unterwegs verstrichen viel zu schnell. Was bleibt sind bunte Erinnerungen und einige scharfe Bilder von Menschen und Orten, lächelnd und sanft. Warum sind die Gedanken daran immer so inspirierend und traurig? Jede Reise hat ihr Ende.

Unser Aufenthalt in Jekaterinburg war kurz. Wir verweilten nicht einmal 24 Stunden in der Stadt. Die meiste Zeit widmeten wir unseren Couchsurfing Gastgeberin, Eva. Danke dir für die schöne Zeit!

image
Blick in eine hoffnungsvolle Zukunft 2

Am Abend des nächsten Tages reisten wir bereits ab. Ein neuer Zug mit gleicher Reisesituation. Wir schliefen wieder in einem Waggon der dritten Klasse.  Diesmal habe ich zwei Liegen in einem Abteil reserviert. Uru bekam die oberen Liege, ich die untere. Hurra! Auf dieser Strecke würde ich leichter schlafen, ohne mit der Angst zu leben, bei einer Notbremsung aus 2 Metern Höhe zu fliegen.

Der Zug fuhr pünktlich los, als könnte er die frische des Abends nicht mehr aushalten. Ich schaute noch einmal verwirrt auf die Uhr, die Zeit stimmte nicht. Das System war mir zu merkwürdig. Mit den Abfahrtszeiten kann man sich hier schnell vertun, denn alle Züge auf der transsibirischen Strecke fahren nach Moskauer Zeit. Sibirien ist das größte Land der Erde mit acht (?) Zeitzonen. Und dennoch richten sich alle Züge und Abfahrtzeiten entlang der transsibirischen Strecke nach der Moskauer Zeit (wollt ihr sicher mit der transsibirischen Bahn reisen, dann lest HIER meine Tipps für die Fahrt). Ich stellte meine Uhr wieder um und rechnete die Dauer der Fahrt in meinem Kopf aus. Etwa 24 Stunden würden wir von Jekaterinburg bis nach Novosibirsk brauchen.

image
Die Wolken malten uns ein tolles Bild bei der Weiterreise

Die ersten zehn Minuten der Reise begannen mit dem üblichen Kennlernritual mit der wichtigsten Person im Zug (nein nicht der Führer), dem Schaffner. Dieser gibt die frischen Bettbezüge aus und an seiner/ihrer ersten Handlung kann schon erfahren, ob er/sie eine angenehme Person ist. Ist der Schaffner mürrisch oder hektisch, sollte man ihm lieber aus dem Weg gehen. Ein ausgelassener oder ruhiger Schaffner dagegen, ist immer für einen Plausch zu haben. Vorausgesetzt man beherrscht die Russische Sprache.

_49315216_moscownicetrain
Der Schaffner in Uniform. Original HIER

Nach der Verteilung der Bettutensilien wurden die Decken bezogen. Hier spielte sich ein anderes Ritual ab: Alle Mitreisenden meckerten wie üblich über die schlechte Klimaanlage im Waggon. Andere wunderten sich, wo eigentlich ihre Decken und Kissen abgeblieben sind. Nach erfolgreicher Suche und weiteren Tauschaktionen, war das Eis unter den Passagieren meist gebrochen. Unsere “Zimmergenossen” waren eine jüngere Frau, die auf der Fahrt kein Wort sagte, und eine ältere Dame. Nach den ersten Smalltalk mit der Dame, wurden gleich Tee und Kekse angeboten. Essen und Trinken verbindet Menschen auf der ganzen Welt, also nicht abschlagen, auch wenn es sich bewegt. Gut in Russland gab es eigentlich eins, was mir persönlich Sorgen gemacht hat, Wodka. Doch das russische Nationalgetränkt fehlte auf den Tischen im Waggon. Vielleicht weil es hier kaum Männergruppen oder alleinreisende Männer gab oder weil wir einfach den falschen Waggon erwischt haben.

Irgendwo floss der Raketentreibstoff dennoch, denn in der Nacht, als unser Wagen schon dunkel und friedlich war, torkelte ein sehr glücklicher Mann durch den Korridor. Scheinbar hatte er sich verirrt, denn er ging auf und ab. Nach seiner erfolglosen Suche legte sich einfach auf eine freie Liege vor uns. Das ging in Ordnung. Sein Schnarchen war nicht ungewöhnlich oder auffällig, aber seine Füße ließen uns keine Ruhe. Ihre Geruchswolke schlich langsam und penetrierend in meine Nasen und weckte mich aus dem Halbschlaf. Ich war nicht der Einzige. Andere Nachbarn wurden wach. Ich hörte, wie sie sich leise zusammentaten und über das Problem diskutierten. Manchmal hörte ich das Wort “Wodka”. Wodka hilft in Russland scheinbar gegen alle Sorgen. Doch dann schlich eine mutige Nachbarin, bewaffnet mit einem Deo-Spray zur Quelle des Übels. Heimlich besprühte sie die Socken. Wenig später tat es ihr eine andere Frau gleich. Doch das alles trug nicht zur allgemeinen Verbesserung bei. Danach geisterte in der Luft eine interessante Mischung aus Käse, Schweiß, Chemikalien und Vanille. Ich schütze mich mit meiner Decke vor dieser Katastrophe. Der Schlaf war kurz.

image
Wie sehr ich kurze Nächte liebe…

Am nächsten Morgen war der Mann so verschwunden, wie er gekommen war und wir erfreuten uns am Geruch vom frischen Tee und mitgebrachten türkischen Bananen. Wir hatten genügend Zeit, um unsere Nachbarn kennenzulernen. Diesmal erregte Uru die Aufmerksamkeit der Leute. In Russland konnte sie als Nordspanische Frau die Blicke der Männer auf sich ziehen, doch heute begeisterte sie alle Anwesenden mit Musik. Sie holte unsere Ukulele heraus und begann, “Don’t worry be happy” zu spielen. Nachdem meine schiefe Stimme hinzugab, mussten die Leute einfach nur zu uns herüberschauen. Die meisten wirkten glücklich und neugierig, was für eine Erleichterung. Unser erstes freies Konzert war doch ein Erfolg. Eine junge Künstlerin neben uns war so begeistert von der Ukulele, dass sie sich später ebenfalls traute zu spielen.

image
Wie die Zeit vergeht

Noch mehr Leute, angezogen von der Musik und von den zwei attraktiven Frauen, setzten sich in unser Abteil. Mit der fröhlichen Musik aus Adventure Time “The Butterflies and Bees” kamen wir alle ins Gespräch über Kulturen und das Reisen selbst. Mit dieser positiven Energie verging die Fahrt so schnell, sodass die Landschaft auf der Fahrt uns kaum in Erinnerung blieb. Irgendwas mit Grün und Bäumen. Zum fotografieren war der Zug leider zu schnell.

image
Oft liegen auf der Strecke kleinere Dörfer

Unser nächstes Ziel rückte immer näher. Novosibirsk, die junge Stadt auf der transsibirischen Strecke. Groß, einladend und erfolgreich sollte sie sein. Dieser Stadt möchte ich gerne einen eigenen Artikel widmen, insbesondere als Dank für unsere fantastische Couchsurfing Gastmutter.

image
Novosibirsk läd ein

Die zwei Tage vergingen wie immer zu schnell. In der herannahenden Nacht und den angehenden Lichtern verließen wir die Stadt und stiegen in unseren vorletzten Zug ein. Vor der Abreise wurden wir noch mit einem Festessen versorgt. So stürzten wir gleich auf die Liegen und verschoben den sozialen Aspekt auf den nächsten Tag. Die Abfahrt bemerkten wir kaum, nur Lichter und Farben rauschten an uns vorbei, zum ruhigen Klang der Schienen.

Hat euch der Beitrag gefallen? Habt ihr Fragen?

Lasst einen Kommentar zurück.

Bis in einpaar Tagen.

Artur

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s